Installation Guide

There are two 'parts' to the toolkit, the client part and the server part.

If you only want to run the toolkit in standalone mode (i.e. on a single computer), you only need the client part. If you are new to the toolkit, we suggest you start by just installing the client part, and worry about the server part later, if and when you decide to start running your computations over multiple computers.

Platforms the toolkit runs on

In standalone mode, we have sucessfully run the toolkit on Linux (SUSE 9.x/Redhat), Mac (OS X), Windows (XP), UNIX (Sun/AIX). The Linux/Unix and Windows versions are best tested.

We have only tried running the toolkit in distributed mode on Unix and Linux. We think that the code 'should' work on Mac and Windows, but we have not tried it yet (we dont currently have access to multiple Mac or Windows machines, and testing it on these platforms is not a priority unless we get lots of requests from users). If you want to try running it on either of these platforms, we are of course still happy to help, but dont expect smooth sailing.

Also, running on a Linux/UNIX environment without NFS is not well tested.

For these reasons, many of the following instructions assume a Linux/Unix environment, and/or NFS. Where instructions are given for other platforms/configurations, be aware that the toolkit wont have been well tested in that configuration. Indeed, for each new release of the toolkit, we only do release testing on a Linux cluster with NFS. You have been warned. We'll consider changing our platform bias if and when it becomes apparent that people are intent on using on other platforms.

What compilers work with the toolkit

If you write your code in Fortran or C, or some other language that compiles to a binary, you should be aware that different compilers behave differently, and this may affect how they interoperate with the toolkit. We cover only the most common (C/C++/Fortran) here.

See here for more discussion of what you need to do to make your code work with the toolkit.

C

Most C compilers should be fine, since the conventions are pretty well established. We have tested gcc/g++ and Intel's C/C++ compiler. If you are using C++, any entry points that the toolkit requires must be stand-alone (C-style) routines, not in any class. The rest of your code can of course be organized as you see fit.

Fortran

Fortran compilers are less straightforward. You should ensure your compiler appends a trailing underscore to subroutine names in the final binary (so a subroutine called forward actually gets an entry point in the binary called forward_). Most fortran compilers seem to append 1 underscore by default, some append 2, and some append none. Many have compile-time flags to let you change this behaviour. The Intel Fortran comopiler appends a single underscore by default (or it did at the time of this writing), and GNU's fortran 77 compiler (g77) appended 2 by default, though it contains a flag to change this to one.

If you are running the toolkit in distributed mode without NFS, there are some additional requirements about the way your compiler handles character array arguments, but since the toolkit is still considered untested/unstable when used in distributed mode without NFS, we do not wish to go into details here, except to say that Intel's Fortran compiler and GNU's g77 both 'do the right thing', and should work fine. We dont know about the other compilers.

Requirements

Before installing the toolkit, you need the following:

Installing the client

  1. Download the file cadiclient.zip from the version of toolkit that you want (latest stable version is here ).
  2. Unzip the file (using WinZip or unzip). You should now have a directory called cadiclient. Open a command prompt in that directory.
  3. At the command prompt, type java CadiInstaller. Answer the questions that the installer asks you.
  4. (Optional) If you want other people to be able to use the toolkit (apart from the person who installs it), you need to make the 'lib' directory writable by those people. Alternatively, these people can install the CadiClient themselves instead, and each user can use his/her own version.
  5. You're done! Now go and read the User Guide for details on how to run the toolkit, and how to use it.

If anything goes wrong during the install (for example, you answer one of the prompted questions incorrectly, or wish to change your answer), it is perfectly safe to re-run the installer. You can do this any number of times.

Installing the server

  1. Download the file cadiserver.zip from the version of toolkit that you want (latest stable version is here ).
  2. Unzip the file (using WinZip or unzip). You should now have a directory called cadiserver. Open a command prompt in that directory.
  3. At the command prompt, type java CadiInstaller. Answer the questions that the installer asks you.
  4. Optional If you know about Java's security policy syntax, you may like to modify the security file caditk.security.policy that ships with the server.
  5. You're done! Now go and read the User Guide for details on how to run the toolkit, and how to use it.

If anything goes wrong during the install (for example, you answer one of the prompted questions incorrectly, or wish to change your answer), it is perfectly safe to re-run the installer. You can do this any number of times.


Back to CADI homepage
This page last updated 29/3/2006
Peter Rickwood. peterr@rses.anu.edu.au